devops

Episode 47: Jenkins Software Delivery Automation and Management with Tracy Miranda, Director of Open Source Community CloudBees

Intro

Michael Schwartz: Hello and welcome to Open Source Underdogs. I’m your host Michael Schwartz, and this is episode 47 with Tracy Miranda, Director of Open-Source Community at CloudBees.

CloudBees is a company behind Jenkins, the famed project, which is used to automate building, testing and deploying software.

Many commercial and open-source projects use Jenkins as part of their continuous integration and delivery infrastructure, including my company Gluu.

Jenkins was forked from a project called Hudson, started by Sun Microsystems in 2005. After Oracle acquired Sun, Hudson was forked and rebranded as Jenkins.

Tracy has been an entrepreneur, a developer, a technologist for around 20 years. She was active in the Eclipse community, serving on the board of directors. She’s also one of the founders of the Continuous Delivery Foundation, which operates under the Linux Foundation.

Hopefully that gives you a little background, so let’s get on with it. Here’s Tracy. Thank you so much for joining today.

Tracy Miranda: Thanks, Mike. It is my pleasure to be here today.

Joining CloudBees

Michael Schwartz: For 10 years, you founded and ran your own consultancy, specializing in Eclipse development – how did you end up getting involved in CloudBees?

Tracy Miranda: Yes. I think the common thread there is definitely open source. So, I think that’s something early on in my career I’ve always been drawn to, especially because of the innovation that you find with open-source communities. And it came at a time I was looking to just make a change in the career and focus a bit more on some of the community building aspects.

And as I was talking to people out in the industry, I got introduced to Kohsuke Kawaguchi, who’s the creator of Jenkins, and at the time was the CTO of CloudBees. And the more he talked about the next stage of CloudBees, and what he wanted to do with Jenkins, the more exciting it sounded to me, so I could not resist the opportunity to join his team and lead the open-source team and try that future direction.

History of CloudBees

Michael Schwartz: So, for the non-geeks in the audience, can you talk a little bit about the history of Jenkins, and how that impacted the development of CloudBees?

Tracy Miranda: Yes, yes. So, Jenkins is a built automation server. It is most commonly used for continuous integration and continuous delivery, which are big parts of delivering software. So, it’s a tool that’s been around for 15 years. Many might know it originally in its first incarnation as Hudson, but it evolved over the years and became Jenkins and became very rapidly adopted by developers and focused on delivering software everywhere, just because it gave you a lot of flexibility.

And it was the first tool that sort of helped you integrate and build your software. And it was really what we’d say is the start of this whole field of developer productivity engineering.

And around it, so companies like CloudBees emerged, offering more Enterprise version. So, when it came to scaling or features around governance and securities, and CloudBees would offer Enterprise Jenkins. And that’s just sort of evolved and evolved, and now the whole space is currently really doing very well as we deliver more and more software every day.

CloudBees Products

Michael Schwartz: So, CloudBees has a number of products and services. For 2020, what are the most important products, with regard to revenue, and what are the most important projects for your future growth?

Tracy Miranda:  In 2020, well – let me talk about the direction we’re going first of all, and then I can bring that back to the present – so, we see just everybody’s delivering a lot more software, and software has become critical to every industry. So, you know, whether it’s a bank or a travel company or insurance company – you name it – software’s a differentiator for them. So, the more software we have, the more we kind of start to talk about like software factories. And you can use the factory metaphor as well to apply it to this.

So, in that model, we talk about Software Delivery Automation, and Software Delivery Management automation is just – the name says it all – it’s everything you need to do to get the software delivered, pretty much like a factory. And then, the Software Delivery Management, or SDM, is the part where you have the business intelligence coming in, how do you make the decisions, what to release when, and to who. So, that’s the direction we’re headed in, and we’re building out all the different parts that contribute to integrating all the tools.

Today, what a lot of companies have is basically focused on continuous integration and continuous delivery, so, tooling around tools like Jenkins, we also have SaaS versions of CICD tools, and then, any tools that help you deliver faster. So, we’ve got a whole kind of portfolio, depending on your flexibility and what you’re trying to achieve.

Market Segmentation

Michael Schwartz: CloudBees is in a very horizontal market. As you mentioned, you are serving customers in basically every industry. Given that, does CloudBees segment solutions or the marketing effort, either vertically, or by use case, or in any other way?

Tracy Miranda: I think probably the most clear segmentation, which we will kind of see, is whether people want to manage it and have things kind of on-premise themselves, or whether they want software-as-a-service. So, that tends to be a key differentiator.

And oftentimes, it will depend on the industry. So, certain industries might have very strict compliance or governance around it. So, perhaps, it always has to be an in-house solution. But then, perhaps some new startups, so, in different segments can afford to go with much more as a service model, where they don’t really want to deal with the nuts and bolts, and the upgrades and the security patches – they’re just happy to focus on what they need to do to get their software out the door.

Why Open Source

Michael Schwartz: Without open source, there probably would be no Jenkins, at least as it currently exists.  And therefore, I guess perhaps no CloudBees. But going forward, why does continuing to invest and contributing to an open-source community materially help the business?

Tracy Miranda: This is my key role at CloudBees is, it’s kind of overseeing the whole open-source strategy. So, you’re absolutely right, CloudBees is based on this massive open-source project, and as we grow and continuing to evolve, we’re going to do a lot more in open source and in different ways.

I think there’s lots of different benefits we see to open source, so, on one side, if you take kind of just the engineering side, there’s obvious benefits from working with the community – you’d get fast feedback, you’d get people contributing.

A lot of the developers we hired in the early days would come from open-source communities, and then they’d even have the advantage of they are already up-to-speed with the processes and the ways of working and the code base.

But then, there’s also other kind of strategic science to open source as well. Open-source projects tend to spread like wildfire, I had someone using the term, kind of the open-source tsunami. And they have a tendency to change the direction of industries, to take something like Kubernetes, which caused a big shift in the whole sort of cloud infrastructure.

So, in that way, we also kind of look at technologies for them to be open and for them to drive the future direction of the industry and help us to get to an innovative place. So, we always want to be involved with open source and find ways to just create those kind of win-win situations for both the community and the company.

Open V. Commercial Features

Michael Schwartz: You mentioned previously that it was an Enterprise version of Jenkins, and I’m wondering about, today, is there still software that’s non open source, and if so, how do you decide what to open-source and what to keep private?

Tracy Miranda: Yes. I know that’s a key thing, and it’s constantly evolving. So, we have an internal process, and we’ll kind of look at the way things are evolving in the market. In general, like you take something like Jenkins, and we have a lot of plugins added by different groups and different individuals in some cases.

One thing that CloudBees do is, for the software like CloudBees Core, or CloudBees CI built on top of Jenkins, is we also offer kind of tiers of plugin, so we know which ones meet a certain level and meet the requirements for Enterprise type customers.

So, this is focused specifically on things like security and governance and running things at scale. So, typically features in those areas, or verifying plugins, will be the areas we’ll tend to kind of have as the more closed source. And anything developers tend to use, this tends to be pretty open.

Open Source Strip Mining

Michael Schwartz: I’m sure you’ve heard this term “open source strip mining”, where large companies take open-source software projects and commercialize them. You know, you have a SaaS, you are offering themselves, but is this something that you’re concerned about, or any thoughts about this sort of phenomenon?

Tracy Miranda: I’ve definitely heard the term, yeah, it’s a pretty controversial one. But I think it is something that is always a consideration. So, you take something like Jenkins X, which is a new open-source project. It’s not related to Jenkins, as the name might indicate, but it’s actually a complete new CICD tool based on Kubernetes. And it’s one of the best ways to do Cloud Native CICD.

So, a lot of Jenkins X is open source, and you could conceivably imagine another company taking it and wrapping it up and delivering it in a specific way, but I think the reality is that open source is always evolving. And it’s more about kind of the vision in the direction it’s going. And the key thing I guess from CloudBees’ perspective is, we have a lot of the people who are driving that direction working for CloudBees.

So, I guess that the people, at the end of the day, are a secret source. So, even if other people want to come and extend it or do it in a different way, I think we’re always kind of focused on what’s the vision, how is this going to evolve, how we’re going to keep pushing the industry forward. It’s a concern, but we try not to spend too much time focused on that, just more time focused on what do the users want and where are we headed.

SaaS V. License?

Michael Schwartz: In terms of monetization strategy, is the Enterprise license the majority of the revenues, or is SaaS the biggest part of the revenue stream?

Tracy Miranda: Yes. Enterprise licenses are definitely the main focus. I think that will evolve over the next set of years, but, for now, that’s certainly the case.

Pricing

Michael Schwartz:  Few questions about pricing, which is hard for a lot of startup entrepreneurs. Many organizations are using Jenkins for free – is it hard to move these customers to a paid offering? What type of gates do you define? Is it per developer? And is pricing still evolving with new offerings, or have you achieved some stability in the pricing area?

Tracy Miranda: Yeah. No, I think this is an area constantly evolving. You know, Jenkins is a great tool, and a lot of people can do a lot of things with that anyway. So, we’re always looking to add value on top of that. So, we find a lot of the customers who see the value of CloudBees, they’re focused on what they need to do as a business, they don’t really want to be messing around CICD is not their value add, so they want kind of the complete package. And that includes the ability to get support and the ability to know things are going to work for them.

When you are sort of doing things in open source by yourself, you tend to run the risks yourself. You can pick up plugins and you have to decide, are these going to work for me, are they going to have the security patches attached. And what happens if something goes wrong? You know, you can’t pick up a phone and kind of call up the open-source community and ask them to fix your thing in a timely manner. That being said, it is a constantly evolving space.

So, I think kind of the offerings and the bundling and the way that works is always evolving. And like we will do things as well, like offer kind of more analytics on top of that, which give people sort of more insights in what they can do with their systems, and yeah, that’s just constantly growing,

Partnerships

Michael Schwartz: What have been some of the more important partnerships for CloudBees in terms of specially impacting the business?

Tracy Miranda: In today’s world, I think you really can’t succeed as a company on your own – we had a recent kind of partnership program, which I think we’ve got a whole bunch of companies who we were working with. My main tendency is to be on the open source and on the Continuous Delivery Foundation – it’s not partnerships in the traditional sense, but a lot of companies on the open-source side we’re working with closely.

And the other big one today is the partnerships with the cloud providers, and with those we have really strong relationships. I think every cloud provider has a marketplace out there, and you can easily access all CloudBees products very easily from the cloud marketplaces. I think this year we’ve also named the Google Cloud partner of the year, so, yeah, a lot of strong relationships, especially towards a whole Cloud space.

Project Governance

Michael Schwartz: You have a lot of experience in this area, so I can’t resist asking, but companies can host their own open source and build their own governance infrastructure around their project, or they can move to a foundation that can help maybe attract a larger community. What’s the strategy of CloudBees there, and how’s that evolved over the years?

Tracy Miranda: Yeah, a great question. So, Jenkins itself pretty much had its own governance, and that worked well and served the community really well for the first kind of ten, fifteen years. You know, it is very alike with model software in the public interest, it provides some great services.  But, eventually, it got to a point where there was some kind of sticking points in the community. These were things sort of shared widely with the community.

Some key things like just having a business entity so that we could get signing certificates, having a more kind of ability to hire for roles that want developers, but other kind of things that are key to software projects, but you don’t necessarily get contributions for. And again, the ability to build a bigger community.

So, these are kind of some of the limitations that we hit. So, Jenkins got to a scale, where it needed to grow past that and to get companies interested and understanding it, they needed a really kind of known model, which is why it then looked at setting up Jenkins in an open-source foundation. And that led eventually to the Continuous Delivery Foundation forming, which is, as the more we talked to folks, the more it made sense, not just to have a single project foundation but to have something where a bunch of folks could come together and work towards a bigger vision.

So, that’s been the key thing. The creation of the Continuous Delivery Foundation is what have helped launch over the last year. And that’s been a major kind of change, both for Jenkins and for CloudBees as a business.

Fostering Diversity at CloudBees

Michael Schwartz: You have been an advocate for a diversity. And I am wondering have you been able to have an impact on how CloudBees builds the team?

Tracy Miranda: Yeah, I think diversity is super important for all sorts of reasons, but especially for business ones. I am very lucky in my position, I head up the open-source team, I’m a hiring manager, so, in a great position to kind of influence that at CloudBees.

So, I have a great team, and I’m happy to say very diverse on kind of multiple accesses. You know, gender and age, and from where we are across the world. So, that’s been really nice.

We also have lots of initiatives at CloudBees. One of the things I’m pleased to say is, there’s a lot of people doing things like CloudBees, and kind of constantly changing the status quo, which is nice, because it’s not always something I have to do, and then I can just kind of focus on my main job. But, yeah, a lot of great folks pushing things in the right direction.

Pandemic Impact On Diversity?

Michael Schwartz: We’re recording this episode in May of 2020, so the pandemic is on everyone’s mind. It’s easy to look at all the negatives, but being an entrepreneur, I think I’m inclined to look at positives. Is there any way we can spin the pandemic as a positive around creating more diverse teams?

Tracy Miranda: That’s really interesting. But I think by moving online and by a lot of companies had this almost artificial limit on, where people can be hired from and all having to live in specific areas, which are often cities, which often have big barriers to entry in some cases. I think by going virtual, you do remove some barriers, you do make it easier for people to be hired from wherever they are, and all of a sudden, that does open up the field for people you can hire from. So, I think, in that way, it can be very positive.

How To Catalyze Gender Diversity In Tech?

Michael Schwartz: Just speaking from my own personal experience, my company is very globally distributed in terms of team members, we have team members from like every continent, except Antarctica. So, we are doing an okay job in terms of diversity, but in terms of getting more women on the team, we’ve faced some challenges.

I know you’ve talked a little bit about this topic, but maybe you can share why do you think there aren’t more women in tech, and what are some of the challenges that women face? And how can we maybe help more women get into the tech business?

Tracy Miranda: I spent a lot of time over the last three or four years trying to understand for myself, because I think at the beginning of my career, I took it a bit for granted. I thought this is just the status quo, this is how it is, but I think it is down to kind of a number of factors all coming together. And you know, unconscious bias tends to be a big feature.

We’ve got just a ton of research that shows how lots of different things have compounded things over the year. I think there’s a great NPR Podcast as well, which talked about the times of women started dropping out of computer science courses. And it was almost because computers in general were marketed towards boys. And it was very difficult for them to sort of coming disadvantages to the courses, and there was not a lot of empathy for that. So, I think that that’s kind of one factor, but there’s a lot of other things in general that play out, just networks and how people bring people into companies.

So, the good news is I think we have more awareness than ever before of what it takes. And then, there’s a number of things we can do. The bad news is, you almost have to keep at it constantly, and things change very, very slowly. But we know, for instance, just representation matters hugely. So, having more women voices, having more women in higher position kind of modeling — I think there’s a great expression “You can’t be what you can’t see.”

And then, just having more not just mentors for women but sponsors who are ready to kind of pull them up in the right channels, help them to get and meet their goals much faster. And I think we’re getting a lot more systematic approaches in place to do this. And actually, I was really glad to see with your podcast, you have a lot of the recent guests have been some very frankly incredible and awesome women. And I think that’s places you start, just having that representation, having those people talking and telling their story.

Advice For Open Source Startups

Michael Schwartz: Thank you. We are doing our best. So, last question, you run your own company for a decade, and you’ve been around open source for a long time, so I’m sure you’ve seen some successes and failures of entrepreneurs who have tried to use open source as part of their business model. If you were starting out from fresh today, you wanted to use open source and build a business around it, do you have any advice for that person about how they should go about it?

Tracy Miranda: I think there’s a lot that gets said about kind of open source and the relationship with business models. I think I completely buy into it. Building off open source has so many efficiencies and so much kind of leads to a lot of serendipity.

I think you see a lot of startups today embracing open source and understanding that it’s not just open source in the sense of code, but what you’re really doing when you embrace open source is building out a community. And I think people understand more than ever how key developers are to any product and how key that community is.

So, not that open source is the only way to do it, but it’s such a great way to do it, and I think the main advice would be: if you’re doing it, you have to commit to it completely. You can’t kind of be half-hearted about open source, you have to commit to the vision and to the community and constantly growing it and tending to it like garden. And then, it will play huge dividends. And we have seen the companies who have done really, really well off open source. It’s just kind of really sort of impressive.

Closing

Michael Schwartz: Tracy, thank you so much for spending some time with us today. And best of luck with CloudBees and with the Continuous Delivery Foundation.

Tracy Miranda: Thanks very much for having me. It’s been great.

Michael Schwartz:  Thanks to the CloudBees team for helping us to promote this episode on social media. Editing by Ines Cetenji. Transcription by Marina Andjelkovic. Cool graphics by Kamal Bhattacharjee. Music from Broke For Free, Chris Zabriskie and Lee Rosevere.

The podcast Twitter handle is @fosspodcast.

Next week we talk to Ev Kontsevoy, founder and CEO of Gravitational. Stay safe everyone. And until next time, thanks for listening.

Episode 46: Create, Deploy, and Manage Modern Cloud Software – Pulumi, with Joe Duffy, Founder / CEO

Intro


Mike Schwartz: Hello and welcome to Open Source Underdogs. I’m your host, Mike Schwartz, and this is episode 46 with Joe Duffy, Founder and CEO of Pulumi.

Pulumi is a platform that lets organizations manage infrastructure in the cloud of their choice, using the coding platform of their choice. It’s delivered as either a cloud service or a software. Joe’s doing a fantastic job executing the Pulumi business plan. No point spoiling the show for you – let’s just dive right in. Joe, thank you so much for joining the podcast today.

Joe Duffy: Hey, Mike. I’m glad to be here, thanks for having me.

Pulumi Products

Mike Schwartz: In one of your past interviews, you described Pulumi as the name of the band, the name of the album, and the name of the song. We’ll take more into the business later, but can you describe the current Pulumi product offerings or maybe I should say super powers?

Joe Duffy: Yes, superpowers, yes. We just launched that sort of as a new marketing theme for ourselves. We started Pulumi because we really have this belief that everybody should be able to leverage the full capabilities of the cloud. The cloud is kind of changing everything about how we build software, and yet, we found that for most developers, the cloud was still sort of an afterthought, which harkens back to the days of virtual machines and N-tier applications.

And on the other side, we found infrastructure teams that are, well, frankly using not-so-great tools, and really what we thought what Pulumi is, “Hey, we can bring decades of programming language innovation, and great tools, and developer platforms, and apply that to the cloud infrastructure space, and really supercharge people’s ability to use the cloud in how they build software. We’re also breaking down some of these barriers between the different sides of the organization.

So that’s our focus, you know, open source was super important to us from day one. And we offer a SaaS for teams and Enterprises that are adopting that open source.

Seismic Changes In Programming From 2004 To Today?

Mike Schwartz: You started at Microsoft in 2004 as a developer and went on to lead teams as a director of engineering. Looking back, what are some of the most fundamental changes in software development that you’ve seen over the years, or what would utterly shock the 2004 Joe Duffy?

Joe Duffy: I think you know a lot has surprisingly remained the same, but the cloud really is the biggest change – it changes everything about what we can do. It’s incredible when I look back, I think at 2004 even, and I was a developer before that, but really back then, like multi-core, multiprocessor systems wasn’t even a thing. And I spent actually a good deal in 2000 working on that.

The fact that every piece of software is a distributed application now, every piece of software has access to infinitely scalable compute and data, and AI, machine learning – all of these capabilities are just an arm’s length away.

Whereas, back then, I mean, we couldn’t even dream of using anything close to those sorts of capabilities. And I think that’s partially why we started Pulumi – we were excited about supercharging people’s applications with those capabilities.

Insights From Microsoft?

Mike Schwartz: From a business perspective, what would you say are some of the most important things that you learned in your 12+ years at Microsoft, or what was most helpful to you to lead Pulumi?

Joe Duffy: It’s definitely interesting, I did not plan on being there that long. I was about to do my own startup before going to Microsoft, but I actually went in part because I knew it was kind of like an extended MBA program for how to build an Enterprise software company.

I think it sounds just, like seeing that sort of innovation at scale, seeing how you keep existing customers happy while still innovating and pushing the boundaries of what your platform can do was really fascinating to see that at Microsoft, and to see how you can effectively innovate and do research while you’re also doing product development. I think that’s a really key thing to be able to do.

Also, a lesson learned over the years was, it was really hard to figure out kind of like what business units actually made money, how did they make money, and how did the money get redistributed across the company. I spent a fair bit of time just reading the PNL breakdowns, and all the investor statements, and trying to figure out, okay, what’s actually making money.

And the funny thing is, there’s a lot of lost leaders in a company like that. In fact, a lot of the open-source investments, frankly, are sort of lost leaders for the real money-makers, used to be Windows, now it’s more Azure at Microsoft specifically. But you see the same pattern, you know, AWS, Google, Cloud, other major players in the cloud, where a lot of the developer tools are really just there to get you to use and pay for their computing storage, and that was an interesting thing to see from the inside at that scale.

Marketing

Mike Schwartz: Pulumi is still a relatively new venture. The marketing team is probably trying to catch up with a momentum of product and engineering – what have been some of the challenges with messaging and extremely complex IT offering?

Joe Duffy: Marketing has been the one part of the company that is constantly changing. I think the product – we’ve really had a very product-led approach in everything we do. The community is everything for us, and so, we lead with the community and everything we do. Even revenue, we only started focusing on last year, and we’re finding that a very inbound-oriented model with open source and SaaS, being a great combination, is working well for us.

So, the challenge really is, how do we find the right people – and that is, the people for which Pulumi is a great solution – and tell them the right story at the right time. Because you can’t be constantly changing your cloud platform every day, so there are particular times we need to find people.

I think that’s been a bit of a challenge. You know, in the early days, it’s probably very common, we tried to tell a more exciting sort of long-term story than the product truth. Especially with the open source, I think you got to get the product truth story nailed first. And we got a little ahead of ourselves. Thankfully, we course-corrected after talking to a lot of end-users. And frankly, I just got out there and went to as many conferences and talked to people as possible – that helped to hone that product truth messaging.

And then, over time, I think you got to be patient. You’ll get there for the longer-term messaging, and it’s important that people know what your DNA and what your company stands for. But even more important than that, on day one, especially with open source, is to understand, what does this product do, why do I care. Especially in the cloud space, where it’s like, there’s a new open-source project every week, if not more frequently than that. And it’s a lot to stay on top of.

Value Prop

Mike Schwartz: So, that leads into my next question, which is, what are the most important value propositions for your customers today?

Joe Duffy: Yeah. We started out thinking they were all technical, and it turns out actually the cultural sort of human component is turning to be important for us. I think the first is, our two main customers, are practitioners, are infrastructure teams, dealing with complexity.

Modern cloud transformation is complex. I mentioned it’s a difficult space to navigate, there’s so many options – many of them don’t work at scale. So, Pulumi, for them, helps them tame the complexity of modern cloud architectures, multi-cloud architectures, modern, even single-cloud but increasingly multi-cloud. So, on the infrastructure team, that’s the thing that’s really helping.

For developers, increasingly developers want to use the cloud in their software. They don’t want to go learn this completely foreign, frankly not as good toolchain. They’d rather just use the tools and techniques that they know and love, and really start incorporating the cloud more into their software. So, it’s great for them.

And then, if you look at the organization, it really helps those two sets of people collaborate and work together. And that’s the cultural part that’s actually fueling most of the growth within our existing customers.

Market Segmentation

Mike Schwartz: Do you segment the market at all? I heard in a previous interview, where you said at the time, you weren’t looking at vertical segmenting, but what about other ways, like size of customers, or how do you look at the market or break it down into something manageable or tackable?

Joe Duffy: This is something we’re learning over time. I think it’s naturally segmenting itself. We have an even spread of customers across SMB mid-market and Enterprise customers. And you know, the takeaway is, like, everybody’s doing cloud. So, everybody is a potential customer for us.

Honestly, running a company, it kind of makes it difficult sometimes to prioritize. The Enterprise needs are not always aligned with the community needs. And so, I think we’ve done a good job of balancing those. For example, we did SAML SSO identity integration very early on, which really was an enabler for us to add more Enterprise value-add features. So, we did a lot of the foundational work that helped us to cater to this broad spectrum.

I’ll also say, we see some verticals, just naturally emerging. And, again, they sort of fall along the same lines of what I was mentioning earlier. You know, folks that are doing modern cloud initiatives. And in certain industries, there’s more of that, like connected cars for example, we’ve got a number of customers in the connected cars vertical that we didn’t plan it that way, but it’s a great partnership with them.

I’d say that the number one thing though is, we listen to our customers, we listen to our community, and we try to let them take us where they need us to go.

Customer Interaction

Mike Schwartz: Interacting with different size customers can be a challenge. Large customers expect one level of support or integration and small customers another – have you seen a big delta there? Or, how do you manage the expectations for some of the larger customers who want more?

Joe Duffy: There’s definitely a very big difference in the engagement model. And I think for us, the key thing was community first for everything. So, we wanted to build a community, nurture the community, build a great community that has bodies or values and is a warm and welcoming place. And what that’s led to is, the community helps the community. And that helps actually, I mentioned this inbound model, where we’re really focusing on open source plus SaaS.

Our goal is that people can get up and running without needing a human to intervene, like they don’t actually need to talk to a sales person. They can download the open-source to get up and running very quickly. People tell us that getting and starting flow is one of the easiest they’ve ever experienced, and we spent a lot of time making sure that was the case.

We’ve got a community Slack, where literally thousands of people are helping each other, and the whole team is encouraged to participate. And so, that takes care of sort of that inbound transactional sort of customer and actually frees up our internal folks on customer pre-sales engineering and post-sales engineering, along with our sales force, to really focus more on those higher target accounts that do want a little bit more white glove service, might want to do a proof of concept, might want some more training and advice as part of the evaluation.

Monetization

Mike Schwartz: Let’s talk a little bit about monetization. Previously, I guess, you had a consumption-based model, where you were pricing based on number of services, but you’ve moved to a per developer pricing model. I’m actually curious, why didn’t the consumption-based approach work?


Joe Duffy: We thought long and hard about this, and we started designing the system so that the open source and SaaS work naturally with one another. So, we have a very high attach rate for people who download the open source. 80% of the people that do that actually use our SaaS, which is great, we have a free tier as well for unlimited individual use. And so, it’s only when you get to a team that you start paying, or Enterprise.

We invented this concept, basically pay-per-project was the previous model. What we found was a few things. And honestly, our hearts were in the right place. We really avoided per user for as long as we could because we want the whole organization to be able to use it freely, we don’t want to stop growing within a group, land and expand is important. But what we found with per project is, no two projects are alike.

Especially in a world of microservices, it’s very common to have mega-projects sitting alongside thousands of little tiny projects. And we didn’t want folks to feel like their architectures were influenced by the pricing model. That felt like an anti-pattern to us, and that was sort of some of the feedback we got on that pricing model.

Although we really did want it to be, “Hey, you pay for what you use.”, and the idea was, “Hey, if you’re using more, you’re seeing more success, and so, you would expect to be paying more.” Per user was just easier for people to model out, easier for people to kind of gauge how much they expect to be spending today versus tomorrow. And frankly, it’s just a familiar model for anybody who’s using a lot of other SaaS products that our customers are using, whether that’s PagerDuty, or Gitlab, or GitHub, or a lot of those other sorts of systems.

I’m not saying per user is perfect, it certainly isn’t, but it’s kind of the least bad that we found today.

SaaS V. Software Revenue

Mike Schwartz: Is most of the revenue from the SaaS platform or from the Enterprise software product?

Joe Duffy: It’s actually a good breakdown, you know. Honestly, it’s about 50/50. Now, it’s importantly, our Enterprise product is actually sold as a SaaS, as an option. So, you can either run, you can use the SaaS as the online hosted version, or you can use a self-host, on-premise version of that.

I’ve been pleasantly surprised at how many people are willing to use the online SaaS because the COGS for us to deliver that service are just so much lower than having to do on-prem support, and installation, and upgrades. And I think my takeaway there is, people now, even more so than even two, or three, or especially five years ago, they are used to depending on cloud services, whether that’s GitHub, or AWS itself, or pick your favorite SaaS.

I think these organizations are getting more comfortable with that sort of dependency. We also architected the system, so that you don’t need to share PII, or Cloud credentials, or anything like that with our SaaS. So, when we go through a security review with one of these Enterprises, they almost always walk away comfortable with where we’ve drawn those boundaries.

Single Versus Multi-Tenant

Mike Schwartz: In your SaaS offering, would you say it’s a single-tenant design, where, each customer has their own sort of database and infrastructure, or is it a shared multi-tenant type of platform?

Joe Duffy: It’s primarily multi-tenant. There are some resources that are per organization, things like, we have a Secrets Management element to the product, and each organization gets their own dedicated hardware encryption key for example. But for the most part, it’s a multi-tenant architecture, unless you use the self-host version, in which case, it doesn’t talk to any shared resources, it can run entirely behind your firewall, it never phones home, so kind of have those two basic models.

Is Pulumi Open Core?

Mike Schwartz: Would you say that Pulumi is open core?

Joe Duffy: I don’t say that, and although some people tell me I shouldn’t be so pedantic on this point because it’s a familiar model to people, but we don’t hold things back from the open-source platform. So, the way I see it is, the entire Pulumi platform is open source.

So, you can use Pulumi entirely offline, and you’re not missing out on any features that are in the platform itself. It’s just that we have a SaaS product that you can choose to use. And that service itself is not open source. So, it’s almost like sort of GitHub. GitHub, you get the Git tool, Git is 100% open source. And then, you’ve got GitHub, and GitHub is a SaaS that you can choose to use or not when you’re using Git, often it’s the easiest way to go.

But that thing is not actually open source. So, that’s the model that we have adopted, where the SaaS, and importantly, the SaaS provides value. And that’s the other thing, where I kind of have some qualms about, where we’re not artificially hampering your experience. The SaaS is there, and you might pay for it because it actually provides significant value that’s worth the money. It’s not that you’re forced to pay for it. So, that’s I think a key distinction as well.

Has Open Source Materially Helped The Business

Mike Schwartz: SaaS provides a lot of the features of a try by fly. So, has open-sourcing really materially helped the business?

Joe Duffy: Yes. I would say especially in the space that we’re in. And I think it would be different for different SaaS products. Like, if you look at PagerDuty, there was something where everything is about the SaaS, and there might be some ancillary tools around it – we’re sort of the inverse of that.

I think it’s table stakes for our space, for developers to change the way they’re writing code, for infrastructure teams to bet their whole organization on this – they need to have something where they have confidence that they’re always in the driver’s seat. And if they need to take things and go, they can do that. So, that was important to us.

The community I mentioned, everything is about community for us. Because of the bet on real programming languages that we made, we allow people to share and reuse packages and contribute to the ecosystem – we have tons of extensibility points. So, if you want to — we’ve had community members bring up, integration with Datadog for example, great, you can do that sort of extension.

If you want to integrate with Spinnaker – we just did a Hackathon with Armory a couple weeks ago, where, if it wasn’t open source, that vibrant ecosystem around it just would have never come to be, and that is essential not only today for how we scale the business, but the long-term sustainability and differentiation of the company itself in large part depends on that.

Foundation?

Mike Schwartz: I was reading today about Google, looking at different foundations, where they might contribute Estio. And I’m wondering, when you have an open-source product, and you’re also hosting it, it’s sort of like enlightened despotism. You know, you’re controlling the roadmap, and you’re making the code open source, but that could always change. We’ve seen a change in some companies.

What are your thoughts about a long-term – does Pulumi ever move to a different governance model, where the roadmap almost becomes part of the community too?

Joe Duffy: I think, never say never. It’s not something that we’re looking at now. I would say if the community takes us in that direction and it’s important to the community, we would definitely go in that direction.

There are a few things. Like, one, we are open in our planning process, we are open with our roadmaps, we are very community-oriented, and how we do all of that. And so, I think, because of that, our end-users feel like they’re part of that process, probably even more so than if it was in a foundation, frankly.

Because a lot of times, in foundations, there are special interests. They’re just not as visible. I think Google definitely has some influence in the CNCF, and so, it’s not a bad thing. You kind of have sponsors, you can have people in the driver’s seat, but I’m just saying it’s not, like, in one model you have no influence, in the other model you do have corporate influence – in all the models you have that level of influence. And I think, really, our community trusts us, and our task now is to make sure we preserve that trust and nurture that trust.

But if there are strategic alignment in projects, I think we would be more interested in partnering up with a foundation. But it’s not something that’s on the immediate radar.

Team

Mike Schwartz: Switching tracks a little bit, is most of the team in Seattle?

Joe Duffy: Yeah, we’re about one-third distributed as far as Europe, East Coast, sort of all over the world, but the two-thirds of the team is here in Seattle.

Mike Schwartz: What are your thoughts about growing the team in the future?

Joe Duffy: The situation, at least at the time of the recording, with the Covid situation, we’re all getting really good at working remote. And that foundation of starting with a third of the team being remote, I think instilled a lot of the foundation we needed to be successful in this new environment.

I wouldn’t say we’re actually suffering too much from it. And I think, if anything, it’s actually helped with our existing remote employees feel like they’re more included in the daily dialogue, we’ve introduced a lot of new practices.

So, in terms of growing the team in the future, I think we’re going to be a lot more flexible in terms of, I don’t know, if we’ll go 100% all remote, you know. I think some people have said they actually enjoy working with people in person, but I think we’re definitely going to be a lot more remote going forward.

And frankly, from here, most of our focus on growth is in the go-to-market side of things. We’re Series A- funded company, we’re looking to that Series B in the not-too-distant future. And really, as we start to build more scalable and repeatable go-to-market motions, we’re going to scale up marketing, we’re going to scale up sales, and so that’s really the focus for us, at least for the next 18 months.

Partnerships

Mike Schwartz: Are there partnerships right now that are critical to Pulumi as business model?

Joe Duffy: I would say all partnerships have been essential. And we’ve done a fair bit of partnering. And that’s an area that, as we look to repeatability, I think one of the challenges is, sometimes I say, “Hey, we’re really good at standing on the top of our own roof, shouting into a megaphone in our own neighborhood, like writing blog posts and tweeting to our existing followers, and nurturing our existing users and helping them be successful – you got to do that. That’s super important.

But what we’re starting to get better at now is leveraging those partnerships to, you know, get into adjacent channels, where there’s actually natural synergy between them. I think that it’s a tough thing to do, you got to nurture those relationships over the long term, but then, some of them start to pay off.

So, the major cloud providers have been great partners with us, but we’ve intentionally built our system to integrate with a lot of other systems, whether those are source control systems, CICD systems, cloud infrastructure providers – in each one of those is a partnership opportunity that we’re just now starting to learn how to leverage to basically grow top of the funnel, while also giving customers a more complete solution because each of these is just really one piece of the puzzle.

Pandemic Impact On Open Source

Mike Schwartz: As you mentioned, we’re recording this episode in April 2020, in the midst of this unprecedented global pandemic. Is there a scenario where the new world that’s emerging will somehow be more fruitful for open-source startups?

Joe Duffy: I think we’re learning to flex a bunch of new muscles, especially when it comes to marketing, more online digital campaigns, events were huge for us in the past. And I think in open-source generally, QCon, it’s great to connect with your colleagues and learn what they’re up to, see how you can incorporate their ideas into what you’re doing. 

DevOpsDays, a great conference that’s very open source oriented, that I personally went to almost a dozen of them last year – those things aren’t happening now. They’re all moving online, and I’ll say it’s a little bit of a stark contrast. It’s not quite the same watercooler kind of informal conversation, it’s kind of hard to have these large group settings, connecting over Zoom, where it’s 30 people on a screen, taking turns, talking to each other.

I think we’re going to invent tools, we’re going to invent new ways of basically moving that conversation online. I think we’re going to come out much better afterwards in that dimension. And that will benefit marketing, that will benefit open source because open source really is about that community dialogue. So, yeah, I think we’ll come out stronger afterwards.

Advice For Open Source Entrepreneurs

Mike Schwartz: Any advice for new entrepreneurs who are launching a business with open source as part of their business model?

Joe Duffy: I would say, we thought long and hard about the monetization strategy. I think the temptation is to launch the open-source project as soon as possible. And frankly, that is a good strategy, you always want to get out there sooner, so you can start getting that sort of virtuous cycle of customer feedback and community building. But it’s really tough to get in a situation where you’ve launched an open-source project is growing vibrantly, but you have no idea how to monetize.

For me, I wanted to build a product company, I didn’t want to build a services organization. That’s a very different playbook. It’s low-margin, lots of people, very expensive to get to scale. You really want to focus on selling product. And if you’re going to do that, it requires really thinking deeply about where that boundary is between what’s free and what something people would pay for.

And my advice is, the thing that people pay for has to be something of value that they want to pay for. You can’t trick somebody into paying for something – it really needs to be valued. And that means you can’t necessarily open source 100% of your value.

Closing

Mike Schwartz: Joe, thank you so much for sharing all these insights today, and thanks for your time.

Joe Duffy: Thanks, Mike. I had a good time. I appreciate the chat.

Mike Schwartz: Special thanks to the Pulumi team for wrangling Joe onto the podcast. Editing by Ines Cetenji. Transcription by Marina Andjelkovic. Cool graphics by Kamal Bhattacharjee. Music from Broke For Free, Chris Zabriskie and Lee Rosevere. The podcast. Our Twitter handle is @fosspodcast.

Next episode we talk to Tracy Miranda, Director of Open Source community at CloudBees, the company is behind Jenkins. Stay safe everyone. Until next time, thanks for listening.